Modernist Breads, the announcement

As promised, here is the announcement of the new book project I wrote about a couple of weeks ago, "Modernist Breads." I've copied the text below but, for photos and a link to the Modernist website, see it in full at:

http://modernistcuisine.com/2014/05/the-art-and-science-of-bread/


(The text below is copied from the link above, written by the folks at Modernist Cuisine. Enjoy! I'll keep you all posted as we get deeper into the project but my recent trip to headquarters in Bellevue, WA, working with Francisco Migoya and his baking team, was very exciting and I expect this book will be like an encyclopedia of bread when it comes out in a couple of years. Anyone who has seen "Modernist Cuisine" already knows how spectacular the photography and content was, so we have a lot to live up to.)

The Art and Science of Bread

We are frequently asked what our next big project will be, and for almost a year we’ve alluded to “having something in the works.” In actuality, our culinary team has been working overtime baking and learning about bread. From crust to crumb, we are excited to finally reveal that our next book will be entirely devoted to the art and science of bread.

Why bread? Because it’s so ubiquitous that we now have vast, daunting selections of breads to choose from at most grocery chains. Many of us have started taking the bread course for granted when dining out.  But bread shouldn’t be an afterthought on the table or simply a building block for sandwiches—breaking open a good loaf of bread, fresh from the oven, is an experience that can evoke nostalgia for years to follow. For many of us, however, baking bread at home is intimidating and shrouded in mystery. Unlike cooking, most breads are made by varying the amounts of four simple ingredients: flour, water, salt, and, of course, yeast. Yet the simplicity of these ingredients is complicated by the intricate science of the bread-baking process and by the fact that bakers must contend with an ingredient that is alive and sensitive to its environment.

With thousands of years of wisdom that inform techniques still used today, the art of baking bread is steeped in tradition. As such, we are researching bread’s rich past and studying the science therein. We have been fortunate to meet a number of talented bakers and chefs who are sharing their expertise and knowledge with us, and we remain on the lookout for new experts and resources.

This project comes with another exciting announcement as we welcome to our team Francisco Migoya as head chef and Peter Reinhart as assignments editor. We are incredibly lucky to have recruited two individuals whose contributions to pastry and baking have already set the bar high.

Under the leadership of head chef Migoya, our bread program has blossomed in a relatively short time. His passion has led him to push the boundaries of pastry arts in savory, pastry, viennoiserie, and bread. Chef Migoya pairs sublime flavors with Modernist techniques to create exquisite, avant-garde pastries and chocolates that are almost too stunning to eat. Having worked as executive pastry chef at The French Laundry, and most recently as a professor at The Culinary Institute of America, his work has earned him recognition as one of the top pastry chefs in the country by both the Huffington Post and Dessert Professional, and he has been imparted Medal of Master Artisan Pastry Chef by Gremi de Pastisseria de Barcelona. Chef Migoya has authored three pastry books, winning a 2014 award for The Elements of Dessert from International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP).

One of the leading authorities on bread, Peter Reinhart will lend his extensive expertise to this project. As a full-time chef on assignment at Johnson & Wales University, Peter teaches courses on baking and the juncture of food and culture. A best-selling author of nine books, his approachable methodologies and techniques have been embraced by home bakers and earned him numerous awards, including Book of the Year (2002) for The Bread Baker’s Apprentice from both IACP and the James Beard Foundation. Additionally, he won James Beard Foundation awards for Peter Reinhart’s Whole Grain Breads (2008) and Crust and Crumb (1997), with a nomination for Peter Reinhart’s Artisan Breads Every Day. His newest book, Bread Revolution, will be released in the fall of 2014.

Our hope for this project is that, by revealing the history, science, and techniques of baking bread, we will create an in-depth multivolume set of books that will be useful and accessible to amateur home bakers, passionate bread enthusiasts, restaurants, and small-scale bakeries alike. But because we are in the beginning stages of this book, we do not know how many volumes it will be or when it will go on sale. There is a lot for us to decide, but we will stay true to the approaches used for Modernist Cuisine, so readers can expect the same level of rigor and detail in our writing, illustrations, and photography as we attempt to showcase bread in a new light.

If you have a burning question about this project, or would like to contribute your expertise, we would love to hear from you. Please contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

 

 

Comments 

 
#1 christopher 2014-07-25 04:56
'Bread Revolution' and whatever is published as a result of your Modernist Cuisine collaboration as well? Think it will not be hard giving my family Xmas present ideas this year! Looking forward to it.

BTW almost a year now that I followed the Perfect Pizza and Artisan bread courses on Craftsy, and in a year my bread (various sorts, but pain a l'ancienne from ABED/Craftsy is the one most requested by my (half-French) family) has really hit a level I'm happy with. Always room for improvement, but I really enjoy it.

Thanks for getting me started :)

BTW, currently on holiday in Juan les Pins, South France. We popped over the border to Italy for a day, and course went for a pizza - the family told me that *my* dough and sauce were better (well my sauce at home = Reinhart NYC dough variation + Reinhart crushed tomato sauce).

Please keep on doing what you do :)
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#2 Peter Reinhart 2014-08-01 11:24
Thank you Christopher! How encouraging to know that your family prefers your pizza to the one you had in Italy. Keep up the great work and thanks for your support!
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Pizza Quest is a site dedicated to the exploration of artisanship in all forms, wherever we find it, but especially through the literal and metaphorical image of pizza. As we share our own quest for the perfect pizza we invite all of you to join us and share your journeys too. We have discovered that you never know what engaging roads and side paths will reveal themselves on this quest, but we do know that there are many kindred spirits out there, passionate artisans, doing all sorts of amazing things. These are the stories we want to discover, and we invite you to jump on the proverbial bus and join us on this, our never ending pizza quest.

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American Pie Artisan Breads Every Day Bread Baker's Apprentice Brother Juniper's Bread Book Crust and Crumb Whole Grain Breads

… and other books by Peter Reinhart, available on Amazon.com

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